Filed Under:Your Practice, Regulatory

ConnectiCare denied premium decrease

The skyline and the Connecticut River are seen in Hartford, Conn., where the offices of the Connecticut Insurance Department are located. AP Photo/Bob Child)
The skyline and the Connecticut River are seen in Hartford, Conn., where the offices of the Connecticut Insurance Department are located. AP Photo/Bob Child)

The Connecticut Insurance Department denied a request by ConnectiCare Insurance Company, Inc. to decrease rates an average 0.91 percent starting October 2012 on policies sold from Oct. 1, 2009 through March 1, 2010 and April 1, 2010 through Dec. 1, 2011.

Requesting a decrease in rates is not the kind of rate request insurers usually make. Connecticut turned down Mutual of Omaha’s 18.7 percent LTCI rate increase proposal just last month. From Sept. 1, 2011 through March 10, 2012, there were 186 double-digit rate increase announcements, according to a HealthCare.gov report.

The Department of Health and Human Services reviewed 28 rate increase proposals from that same period and concluded 71% were unreasonable. 

In its July 18 request, ConnectiCare said the new rate reflects its members’ drop in use of medical services over the two previous years, especially with hospitalization costs.

Following an actuarial review, the Insurance Department determined the rates could be lowered further, and denied the request as submitted by ConnectiCare. The department then approved a 3.4 decrease for policies sold from Oct. 1, 2009 through March 1, 2010 and a 2.2 percent decrease on policies sold from April 1, 2010 through Dec. 1, 2011, deciding the new rates were in relation to the benefits offered.

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