Filed Under:Health Insurance, Individual Health

What's next for retiree health care

Companies have been cutting back on retiree health benefits for years. Indeed, the latest survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) found that among large firms with employee health coverage, just 28 percent offer some form of retiree benefits, down from 66 percent in 1988. Among smaller firms, help is even scarcer.

Disappearing corporate benefits is one reason the new public exchanges created by Obamacare will be such a boon to early retirees. But even for seniors who still get help from a former boss, change is afoot, no matter your age.

Here's what to watch for:

Early retirees: If the public exchanges succeed, firms that offer pre-Medicare coverage may give those ex-workers funds to buy a policy on one, says Tricia Neuman, director of KFF's Program on Medicare Policy. Employers are taking a wait-and-see approach, but that could change fast.

Retirees 65 and up: About a third of Medicare recipients have supplemental coverage from a former employer, says Neuman, and some of them are already seeing changes. Several major companies, recently IBM and Time Warner (MONEY's parent company), are shifting retirees 65 and older from company-run plans to private exchanges operated by benefit consultants and insurance brokers.

Read the complete story here.

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